As An Estate Sale Company You Need To Know What You Are Selling

As An Estate Sale Company You Need To Know What You Are Selling

Most of us have learned about people buying original works of fine art and antiques at estate sales for pennies, and brag about it on Antiques Roadshow. As professional estate sellers, we need to step up our game or suffer the same consequence.

That consequence results in financial loss by improper identification and research of important items, and loss in sales to estate auctions that are in direct competition with estate sale companies.

estate sale company
Vogt Estate Sale Company

You don’t have to be an expert to spot things of value, which is what you need to focus on to stop letting the pickers rob your estate sales and brag about it!

We all love to find things of value, but when we are representing our client’s best interest, and our own bottom line, we need to become more vigilant in how to spot things of value. I cannot stress this enough!

We are the “sellers,” therefore, it is our responsibility to document (inventory) all of the estate contents for sale, especially things that could easily be misidentified and sold as a “mistake.”

In addition to knowing how to recognize things of value, you need the right estate sale supplies to make your job easier — and help your client achieve their goal. More on this website

We are living in the “baby boomer” era, which not only means there is enough stuff for anybody to sell around the world; our children stand to inherit fine works of art, antiques, collectibles, and large sums of money.

So while we’re on the subject: Is your estate sale waiting to make someone’s day, could some of those valuables your children stand to inherit end up in the wrong hands?

More to the point, when your client doesn’t know the value of certain items in the house and hires you to “just sell it all because they don’t have time to deal with it,” does not mean they do not want their personal property sold for a higher return.

Another way to solve this problem is to hire an appraiser to learn about the value of fine works of art, period jewelry, etc., but this is extremely costly.

However, it will benefit the client and you in the long term if it becomes necessary. Is the client willing to pay for this service? Are you?

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